Top 33 Mother’s Day Horrorfest Picks (Pt. 2: 11-21)

Posted: May 6, 2014 in Film, List
Tags: , , , ,

Part II of the madcap matriarchs countdown continues with #11-21 (22-33 ; #1-10):

21. Natalie Koffin played by Rebecca De Mornay in Mother’s Day (2010), directed by Darren Lynn Bousman: Inept criminal brothers escape jail and return to their childhood home not realizing their mother doesn’t live there anymore. They hold the new owners and their guests hostage as they await instructions from their mother. It turns out the captives were better off before the sadistic ring leader arrived on the scene. A remake of an 80’s movie by the same name that I have not yet seen and thus, is not included here.

20. Mary Brady played by Alice Krige in Sleepwalkers (1992), directed by Mick Garris: Mary Brady and her son have a unique relationship, in part because they are the only known members of a bloodthirsty species that feeds on people’s life-force. Their outsider status binds a close, downright incestuous relationship and mom is non too pleased when her son starts noticing other girls his own age.

19. Christine Penmark played by Nancy Kelly in The Bad Seed (1956), directed by Mervyn LeRoy: One of the great horror classics (My review here). Nancy Kelly reprises her stage role as a mother falling apart as she slowly comes to the realization that her young daughter is an emotionless serial killer. She suffers alone, amidst a parade of comedic charactures, whilst trying to figure out how to protect her little devil and the people around her.

18. Beverly R. Sutphin played by Kathleen Turner in Serial Mom (1994), directed by John Waters: An amusing horror comedy concerned with the possibility that a seemingly perfect, doting mom is in fact a serial killer.  Could she be doing people in for lapses in what she considers responsible behavior – like recycling their trash.

17. Mrs. Violet Venable played by Katherine Hepburn in Suddenly Last Summer (1959), directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz: Unhinged by the death of her momma’s boy son Sebastian, Mrs. Venable will stop at nothing to protect his good name, even if it means tricking psychiatrist (Montgomery Clift) into lobotomizing her niece (Elizabeth Taylor). This film burned quite an impression on my young mind as I suspect it did Eli Roth’s as his creepy Hostel kids are very reminiscent of Sebastian’s horde of boys. According to IMDB.com screenwriter Gore Vidal credited it’s success with a bad review which denounced it as “the work of degenerates obsessed with rape, incest, homosexuality, and cannibalism among other qualities.” Tennessee Williams wrote the original play on which it’s based.

16. Rosemary Woodhouse played by Mia Farrow in Rosemary’s Baby (1968), directed by Roman Polanski: In Polanski’s first American film, a young woman becomes increasingly paranoid that everyone around her is involved in an evil conspiracy concerning her unborn child. The stellar cast includes John Cassavetes and Ruth Gordon.

15. Possessed Henrietta Knowby played by Theodore Raimi in Evil Dead II (1987), directed by Sam Raimi: From the moment Annie Knowby enters her parents cabin the laughs, thrills and scares are nonstop, punctuated by the intermittent, tormenting commentary from her possessed, dead mother who is locked in the root cellar. One of the best and most fun horror films of all time, with lead Ash brilliantly played by Bruce Campbell.

14. Donna Trenton played by Dee Wallace in Cujo (1983), directed by Lewis Teague: Stephen King himself is on record stating Wallace’s performance is the best in any of his films. She portrays a mother who is trapped in a Pinto with her young son while being attacked by a rapid St. Bernard. One of the few actually scary movies based on King’s novels.

13. Mommy played by Wendy Robbie in The People Under the Stairs (1991), directed by Wes Craven: A gem by horror master Wes Craven, who wrote and directed. A young boy and two burglar adults break in and become trapped inside the house of his evil landlords. They discover they are not alone. A crazed brother and sister who call themselves Mommy and Daddy have been kidnapping young kids to create the perfect family. Once the children disappoint they are locked up under the stairs and replaced.

12. Rachel Keller played by Naomi Watts in The Ring (2002), directed by Gore Verbinski: Reporter Rachel Keller discovers a tape which when watched results in the viewer’s death within seven days.  Having been careless enough to let her son have access to it, she’s now in a race to save both their lives by uncovering the truth about the mysterious little girl shown on the tape.  The only American remake of a Japanese horror film (Ringu 1998) that was as good (or better) than the original. Ringu and its remake are arguably among the most influential films in horror.

11. Ada played by Uta Hagen in The Other (1972), directed by Robert Mulligan:  This eerie, dream-like treasure tells the story of a young boy in the 1930’s who suspects his twin of being responsible for several deadly accidents in their farm community. With the recent death of his father and the loss of his mother to depression, his grandmother tries to fill the parental void by teaching the boy astral projection.  She soon fears her game has helped erode his grip on reality.

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