Archive for the ‘Film Noir’ Category

Noir at its Best: The Window (1949)

Posted: November 22, 2013 in ****, Film Noir

At the intersection of horror and crime drama lies another of my favorite genres, Film Noir.  Recently I saw for the first time one that kept me on the edge of the couch more than any horror movie I’ve seen in a while – 1949’s The Window.  Like another favorite of mine, Night of the Hunter, The Window is centered around a young boy being relentlessly stalked.  Only in this case it’s not something he possesses his stalkers are pursuing, they are out to kill him because he has witnessed a murder they committed.

The boy is played by Disney’s Bobby Driscoll and he does an incredible job.  In fact, it earned him a juvenile Oscar in 1950 at 13 years old. Driscoll is one of Hollywood’s saddest stories.  Praised widely for his talent, he was released shortly after making Peter Pan, for which he was not only the voice of Pan, but the visage who inspired the animated character.  The story goes that he was released due to acne and soon developed a drug habit and legal problems which resulted in being boycotted on both film and stage. By 31 he was found dead in an abandoned building and buried in an unmarked pauper’s grave before it was realized who he was.  It has been claimed that Michael Jackson’s initial surgeries were an effort to create Bobby Driscoll’s nose.

While The Window has some in common with Rear Window, in that it opens with little Tommy witnessing a murder through a window, it is actually inspired by the fable Peter and The Wolf and the movie begins with a quote from Aesop.   Tommy has an active imagination and a propensity for tall tales.  So, when he recounts the atrocity he has witnessed to his parents (played by Barbara Hale and Arthur Kennedy) and the police no one believes him, leaving him on his own to face his evil neighbors.  Both Rear Window and The Window are based on short stories by Cornell Woolrich.  Woolrich had many of his stories and novels made into films, especially Noirs.  IMDb.com lists 100 such writing credits from movies like The Leopard Man to television episodes on shows like Alfred Hitchcock Presents.

Little Tommy is frustrated by his inability to get the attention of the adults around him.  Worse, in an effort to prevent him from getting into more trouble, his parents, who due to their financial woes must leave him alone during the day, lock him in their apartment, nail the window shut and tell the neighbors what he has said about them.  He is cornered and at the mercy of the killers.  Joe Kellerson, played by one of Noir’s most prolific villians, Paul Stewart, is no holds barred in his pursuit of Tommy.  One scene in particular, when Kellerson and his wife (played by Ruth Roman) catch up to Tommy completely took me by surprise with it’s depiction of a violent act towards a child that is still shocking by today’s standards. And, the finale is one of the tensest chases and standoffs ever put to film.

The Window was actually made in 1947 but shelved by Howard Hughes when he took over RKO due to his opinion that viewers weren’t interested in movies centered on children.  But, when it was released it saved the studio and propelled the careers of all involved save Driscoll, including director Ted Tetzlaff who was more associated with cinematography from films such as Notorious.

The Window has been remade multiple times including as The Boy Cried Murder (1966), Eyewitness (1970) and Cloak & Dagger (1984).

http://www.tcm.com/mediaroom/video/579269/Window-The-Movie-Clip-You-ve-Had-A-Bad-Dream.html

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